How to Stop Cats From Peeing on Furniture

Cat Spraying No More

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So you’ve just had your new kitty for a few months now and everything is going well, until suddenly you notice a strange smell…

It’s not coming from the litter tray, and it’s certainly not the trash. So what could is it?

After some inspecting around the house, you find it’s coming from your furniture, what the!?

Unless your furniture usually smells of pee, it’s likely your cat has been up to no good. Known as spraying or marking, sometimes cats like to leave their scent around the house by peeing.

If your cat has just started peeing on furniture then don’t worry, it’s not a permanent thing. With the right guidance and training, you can stop your cat from peeing and leaving a foul stench.

But before we look at ways to stop your cat from peeing everywhere, why exactly do they do it in the first place?


Why Is My Cat Peeing On My Furniture?

The first and most obvious reason why cats pee on furniture is because they are not trained.

If you have a well-trained kitty, then they should be doing their business in the litter tray and nowhere else. If your kitty is still young, then they might have the occasional mishap every now and then, but they shouldn’t be doing it on a regular basis.

The second and most common reason why cats pee on furniture is because they are marking their territory. Also known as cat spraying, in this case, the cats aren’t actually urinating on your furniture but instead they are spraying.

To understand the difference between the two, take a look at the diagram below.

When a cat goes to the toilet to urinate, they sit down in their litter tray or on the floor. But when a cat sprays, they back themselves up against a wall and raise their tail. It’s also important to note that they don’t continually spray. Instead, they let out a few streaks which leave the marks and smell on the surface.

If you’ve found lines of liquid sprayed on the side of your furniture then it’s most likely your cat spraying and not peeing.

So why is your cat doing this in the first place? Well, it could be a number of reasons, both medical and behavioral. If your cat has an infection and trouble peeing, then it will most likely start to spray to release urine. If you haven’t seen your cat use their litter tray for a few days then they could be having trouble going to the toilet. The best thing to do in this situation is to take them to a vet to get a checkup.

However, if they all look fine and have been using their litter tray regularly, then it’s probably a behavioral issue.

Cats are very territorial animals and love to mark their territory by leaving scents. If your cat feels threatened or insecure, then they will start to leave their scent around the area by spraying. Other factors that can make cats start spraying include environmental changes, stress and new cats in the neighborhood.

Whatever the reason your cat is spraying, remember that it’s not permanent and all cats can be taught to stop. So how exactly do you stop them from peeing on your furniture?


Ways to Stop Cats From Peeing on Furniture

Now you know why your cat is “peeing” everywhere, how the hell can you stop them from doing it?

We’ve outlined the most common ways to stop your cat from spraying below.


Put Mouthwash on Your Furniture

A common method that many owners have had success with is using mouthwash to stop cats from peeing on furniture. As crazy as it may sound, there is some reasoning behind it. By spraying mouthwash over your furniture it gives off a strong smell that cats don’t like. This means they’ll stay away from the furniture at all costs, or until the smell fades away.

If you have other furniture in your house, then be sure to spray that or else they’ll just find somewhere new to leave their business.


Move Their Litter Tray

Another way to stop your cat from spraying is by moving the position of their litter tray. Sometimes if a litter tray is in a noisy or hard to reach place, it can often put your cat off from doing their business. Maybe you have it next to a washing machine that’s constantly making noise. Or perhaps you have it in another room that requires you to open the door every time they need to go.

Moving your cat’s litter tray can sometimes fix inappropriate peeing overnight. We recommend moving it to somewhere that’s well lit, easily accessible and quiet. Then your cat has no reason no excuse not to use their litter tray.


Teach Your Cat To Stop Peeing Furniture

If you’ve discovered your cat’s been peeing on your furniture, then it’s time to make them stop. No matter if they’ve been neutered or not, cats can spray regardless. The only difference between a cat that sprays and a cat that doesn’t is their behavior.

Some cats feel the need to assert their presence and authority by marking their territory and area. While other cats already feel safe and don’t need to bother. The secret is to make sure your cat feels safe and isn’t stressed out.

Maybe there’s something in your house that’s causing your cat to spray. Or maybe it’s the location of their litter tray. Whatever it is, you need to identify the cause and then fix it.

If you’re looking for help in stopping your cat from spraying, then we can help. Our T.T.S (touch, taste, smell) method has helped thousands of cat owned stop their cats from spraying. By following our simple PDF eBook you can teach your cat to stop spraying in 7 days or less. Stop wasting your time and money on cleaning supplies, cease cat spraying today!

Click below to find out more about our guide and what’s included. We’re confident you’ll love the bonuses!

This is is a syndicated post. Read the original at ceasecatspraying.com

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